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Green crush of the week

When you see a man with a giant fly calling himself an environmental capitalist , your natural inclination might be to run. But give Jason Drew, eco entrepreneur and author of The Story of the Fly and How it Could Save the World, a chance. 







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Could the fly save humanity?

We take for granted the fact that we should recycle our glass, newspapers, tin and more recently plastic and water. Businesses and services have sprung up to enable us to achieve this. But this is only the tip of the iceberg. Creating and discarding nutrients in the form of sewage, manure and abattoir blood has a far higher environmental impact. When we start to recycle these we will be truly on the path to some sustainability for our planet. As the old Yorkshire saying goes – where there is muck there is money. Let me explain.


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Turning a pest into protein

Rising feed costs have made chicken farmers look to unusual sources of protein – and you can’t get more unusual than maggots. Robyn Joubert reports.



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Simply Green Book Review

A follow-up in some respect to Drew's work, The Protein Crunch, this one is a serious book despite its jocular title and playful title. 
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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

What's the lowly house fly got to do with the $60 billion fish farming industry?

Quite a lot, says Jason Drew, a jet-setting British entrepreneur who is so enthusiastic about the potential of flies, he's just written a book called The Story of the Fly and How It Could Save the World. He thinks flies can solve one of aquaculture's most vexing issues: what to feed the growing ranks of farmed fish.

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Sustain our Africa: From maggots to marketing

Thursday was day two of the Sustain our Africa summit, Africa’s first big pow-wow about sustainability. The programme saw speakers and delegates grapple with important issues ranging from food sources to investment in sustainable business. From a man farming maggots to another trying to reform advertising, there were some invigorating ideas on the menu. By REBECCA DAVIS

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Fly larvae used as alternative protein source

A British entrepreneur based in South Africa is confident that his dried fly larvae will be the alternative protein source that can reduce agriculture's dependence on fishmeal



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Farmed insects could provide feed for livestock

Near Lake Victoria, the poorest people depend on a small fish that used to be cheaper to purchase than most other foods. Now that this fish is being used as feed for fish farms and for pet stores, the price has gone up so only well-off consumers can buy it.
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UK: Fly farming ‘can save the world’ says author Jason Drew

Jason Drew, author of The Story of the Fly and how it could save the World, believes that the insect, widely regarded as a pest, should be used to provide a protein-rich diet for chickens and fish.



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FM Life - Book Revue

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Flies can save the world – just stop using fish meal -

OUR GLOBAL food system is falling to pieces, yet we have solutions all around us. We take for granted the fact that we should recycle our glass, news- papers, tin, plastic and water. But this is only the tip of the iceberg.
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Nourishing solutions

A coffee table book on hunger and malnutrition comes with its contradictions. Yet, if the intention was to encourage us to read fascinating but sometimes unpalatable truths about who eats and who doesn't, author Leonie Joubert and photographer Eric Miller have achieved their aim.
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Jason Drew Undone

Cape Town-based visionary and ‘green business’ serial entrepreneur Jason Drew travels the world creating entities that will sustain natural resources, such as our dwindling fish supplies.

His latest venture involves fly farming, turning waste into larvae, and a protein-rich, natural animal feed.

He tells Sue Grant-Marshall about a ‘new sustainable revolution’, and how a health scare changed his life
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Maggoted: flies for feed

If using maggots as animal feed sounds a bit way-out, think again: the world's first maggot factory will be commissioned in South Africa next year.

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Maggoted: flies for feed

For South African eco-capitalist Jason Drew, that's just the first step in a much bigger ambition - to replace the global use of fishmeal as animal feed with maggots, a virtually unlimited renewable resource.

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The fly could be the planet's future hero

A self-confessed environmental capitalist called Jason Drew claims the common housefly could help save the planet by providing a natural alternative to fishmeal as an animal feed, thereby feeding the world and reducing the pressure on overfished seas.
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Lucacept – intercepting the Web

 Jason Drew, an Eco-entrepreneur had a really interesting story to share. Take a look at the following TEDx talk he delivered in 2011 to see what I mean.

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Breeding Barren Bugs

IN 2008, serial entrepreneur Jason Drew sold his industrial revolution businesses and began building sustainable revolution businesses .
That turned out to mean flies, mosquitoes and the cotton boll worm, heliocoverpa.
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HOW THE FLY COULD SAVE THE WORLD

Rather than being a mere pest, the fly, according to Jason Drew, are pioneers in our modern world - making medical miracles and even inspiring aerodynamic design. They set fashion trends, travel in space and have the potential to do so much more


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Poultry farmer now Lord of the Flies

Stellenbosch-based AgriProtein is, according to Farmers Weekly, commercialising the use of flies in the poultry industry by using their larvae to make a dried, natural feed. This is meant to be an alternative to fish meal, maize and soya — which make up the bulk of most commercial chicken protein feeds.


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Farming Flies and Selling Mosquitoes – Repairing our Future

One of life’s privileges, I think, is being able to see the world differently from time to time. The process of trying on a different pair of glasses through which one views the world can be quite refreshing. 
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Let them eat maggots

FROM manure, to maggots, to meat, to a meal. This food chain sounds revolting but its environmental merits are hard to dispute. It makes use of a commodity that is usually just discarded, and the alternatives are increasingly scarce and expensive (see Extreme recycling turns poo into food ).
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Jason Drew's super flies

A story worth telling, as the book explores everything from how the fly walks on ceilings to how it survives Ice Ages and outsmarts all manner of fly swats, toxins and traps. It also reveals that throughout history innovative humans have harnessed and researched the fly to help mankind

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Fly larvae may replace fishmeal in poultry feed

According to Farming Weekly Interactive, Jason Drew - a British entrepreneur based in South Africa is confident that his musca domestica (the common housefly) dried fly larvae will be the alternative protein source that can reduce agriculture's dependence on fishmeal. Currently 25% of the fish taken from the sea is used in fishmeal.
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Green Pioneers: Lord of the flies is saving our fish

JASON DREW was bored.  As the Yorkshire-born businessman recuperated on his South African farm, 150km from Johannesburg, he started to think of ideas for businesses.



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Little Green Mag 17th September 2012

At least that's according to new book by Jason Drew. Self confessed environmental capitalist, Jason Drew explains in his new book out next week, how the fly is helping save the planet and is providing a natural alternative to fishmeal as an animal feed - helping reduce the pressure on our overfished seas.


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Global Aquaculture: Betting on a fly

Any fly fisherman will tell you that fish will gladly eat flies. So why are aquaculture farms feeding them fishmeal, particularly when costs continue to skyrocket?
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It is without doubt Africa’s Century

Drew says Africa has the land, water and minerals that the world need and as the West declines and the East rises, Africa will be the new battleground of the superpowers.

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Food From Insect

Common house flies (Musca domestica) may be a cheap and sustainable source of feed for farm animals, according to a scientist and an entrepreneur.

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This might be enough to turn me vegan, ...

The flies, whose larvae can be bred, nurtured and ground into granules, provide roughly the same amount of edible protein as fish meal and other widely used protein sources, said entrepreneur Jason Drew.

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

He also noticed, he says, that the price of fish meal was moving in one direction only: up. Unless we find a new sea.

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Why Flies? Maybe for Fish Farm Feed

In my book Spineless Wonders: Strange Tales of the Invertebrate World, I included a chapter with the headline, “Why Did God Make Flies?”

Now we know, thanks to this intriguing report from NPR’s Eliza Barclay.  Recycled maggots, anyone?

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

A South African entrepreneur has found a way to make food out of flies for farm-raised chicken and salmon. He says fly meal can replace fish meal for aquaculture and some livestock, and help conserve wild fisheries that are now being depleted in the race to find enough protein for the planet.

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Maggots to be fed to farmed salmon?

What’s the lowly house fly got to do with the $60 billion fish farming industry?

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

And so aquaculture experts all over the world are scrambling to figure out what to do about it.

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

Drew says it's only a matter of time before more entrepreneurs around the world discover fly farming.


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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

Of course, the search for a fish meal replacement goes far beyond flies. Researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are looking for ways to use more marine algae, fish processing trimmings and plants in fish feed. And as we reported last year, other scientists think biofuel co-products, poultry byproducts and soybeans have potential, too.

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

A few years back, Drew was checking out some farms in Saudi Arabia that were exporting chicken and shrimp to South Africa, where he lives. He saw all the fish meal going to feed those creatures, and got to thinking just how unsustainable it was.

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

After a couple of years of tinkering, his team figured out how to produce protein-rich larvae in bulk. It helps that one fly can lay up to 1,000 eggs, and 1 pound of eggs can grow into 380 pounds of larvae.


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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

Farm-raised salmon, trout and shrimp need a lot of animal protein in their diet. Right now, that protein comes mainly from small, wild fish that are turned into fish meal.

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

Farm-raised salmon, trout and shrimp need a lot of animal protein in their diet. Right now, that protein comes mainly from small, wild fish that are turned into fish meal. It takes about 3 pounds of fish to produce 1 pound of farmed salmon, and as we continue to deplete wild fish stocks, fisheries experts say we're going to run out.

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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

That's 100 tons we don't have to take out of the sea, he says. And we can't keep up with demand.


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How Fly Farming May Help More Fish Stay In The Sea

He says fly meal can replace fish meal for aquaculture and some livestock, and help conserve wild fisheries that are now being depleted in the race to find enough protein for the planet.

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Creation Road Interview

There are almost no examples of people and workers moving from a society to a communist society. Yet still today there are over 115 Communist parties in countries around the world, but not one party that is happy to call itself a capitalist party. We should be clear about what we are and therefore I have coined the phrase and termed myself an environmental capitalist. It is what I am! 

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Losing Natural Biodiversity Could Cost us the Earth

Jason Drew, author of the Protein Crunch explains how you only need to look at the shelves of your local supermarket packed full of “Baby Hake Fillets”, “Sole Petite” and other immature fish to understand the extent of the problem: “The only full size fish are farmed ones fed on even smaller fish caught at sea. We have already eaten their parents.


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Magmeal instead of fish meal

According to the FAO, 77% of fish species are threatened by overfishing, and 37% of the global catch of fish is used for cattle feeding and farming.
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Maggots: a sustainable animal feed

An enterprising duo has developed a sustainable alternative to fishmeal and soya livestock feeds, in the process helping to ease the pressure on precious natural resources which are constantly under strain from the growing human population.

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Farming Flies and Selling Mosquitoes – Repairing our Future

One of life’s privileges, I think, is being able to see the world differently from time to time. The process of trying on a different pair of glasses through which one views the world can be quite refreshing.

And funny too. This is what I thought, listening to one of the many inspiring speakers at the recently concluded annual Tallberg Forum that took place in Sweden.

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Abbatoir waste and fly larvae create sustainable, natural animal feed

Research and development Testing with the University of Stellenbosch Animal Nutritional Department started three years ago and he explains that it took a great deal of time as well as trial and error to get the flies to live together in such substantial volumes and lay their eggs in one place. “We also had to match the waste product type to the larvae type. A housefly, for example, can lay 1,200 eggs in her lifetime and is a good consumer of almost all abbatoir waste; while black soldier flies have the enzymes to break down very starchy waste like vegetables.

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Feedstock for jam?

The Biocycle team breed maggots, sorry I mean Black Soldier fly larvae, which could prove to be an extremely efficient and valuable method of dealing with food waste.

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A new fish meal - made from flies

The rich are already consuming the water of the thirsty, eating the food of the hungry and burning the fuel of the cold. What shall we conjure up next for the poor? - Jason Drew, international businessman, serial entrepreneur

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Hope without action is just a comforting illusion

There are a lot of brands also struggling with sustainability and how to get the message across and while I don’t disagree with the book’s points, it seems like a threatening way to go about communicating the message that en masse, we need to take better care of the planet by polluting less and conserving more.

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Eco-Entrepreneurs Needed To Save Our Earth

I firmly believe that the next Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg will make their fortunes in the business of saving the environment.

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Water’s role in the protein crunch

Until last year, the water-energy nexus was a big enough concern on its own. Over the past twelve months, the challenge of feeding the world’s seven billion people has been added to the mix. The essential challenge is as follows: if we want to increase energy production, we might need to use biofuels, which use a lot of water and land which could be used for growing food.


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A Good Week

An unashamed capitalist, author Jason Drew seeks solutions that make economic as well as environmental sense. When we asked ‘What does good mean to you?’, this is what Jason had to say…
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The Protein Crunch: Civilisation on the Brink

Jason offers conditional hope for the future: and the condition is that certain actions are taken now rather than postponed. Hope without action is just a comforting illusion.
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The Business of Saving the World

We are used to finding Regent's College alumni working in challenging professions but it isn’t often that ‘saving the world’ crops up on the average CV

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Book review : The Protein Crunch : Civilisation on the Brink

Jason offers conditional hope , a chance to turn things around if we take action
now. He has stated that the next Bill Gates will make his fortunes from the business of the environment and Jason himself is already investing in environmental business methods

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Saving the planet with flies

In 1973, a film called Soylent Green, starring a young Charlton Heston was produced based on a 1966 novel, Make Room! Make Room! by Harry Harrison. It was set in 2022, in a world suffering the effects of global warming and massive food shortages. Farms were under military protection and only the rich feasted on meat and vegetables.
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The Protein Crunch: Civilisation on the brink

Only 25% of all water around the world goes to the sea, river after river no longer goes to sea and by the looks of things in about 10 years time the Nile River may not aswell. Is that really what we want for our world to become?

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The Protein Crunch, the other one…

The iRev talks to Jason about whether, as the book claims, civilisation as we know it is indeed on the brink and whether we can do anything about it.

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The business of saving the environment

Jason takes an entrepreneurial approach to looking for solutions to the environmental problems we face: from using larvae to recycle waste, to creating GM mosquitoes to limit Dengue fever and innovative urban wind farms to power our cities. An unashamed capitalist, Jason seeks solutions that make economic as well as environmental sense

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Repairing the future: business saving the world?

Jason’s unique, sometimes controversial and amusing presentation on the business of repairing the future includes interesting scientific facts as well as first-hand insights into our fragile and fascinating world, providing clear examples that people can relate to in their everyday lives.
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Saving seas with slaughterhouse flies

The information he's gathered all over the world packs a gut-punch. But, he's less doom-monger than dynamic businessman with a project here in SA that could help save our seas - h e's making protein from abattoir waste. It's what he calls his love story with the fly and how it could feed the world.

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Abattoir flies are a great source of protein

Larvae are known as a natural food of chickens in the wild and fish in streams. It is said that their nutritional composition is as good as that of fishmeal and better than soya. As a natural food it has an excellent take-on and digestibility properties.

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Rescuing our Future

Current lack of action on climate change will by 2025 cut fresh water supplies so as to reduce food production by 350 million tonnes per year - equivalent to the entire US grain harvest. These are just two of the multitude of factors that are listed.

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